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The Good Soldier Švejk

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Map of Austria-Hungary in 1914 showing the military districts and Švejk's journey. The entire plot of the novel took place on the territory of the Dual Monarchy.

The Fateful Adventures of the Good Soldier Švejk is a novel which contains a wealth of geographical references - either directly through the plot, in dialogues or in the authors own observations. Jaroslav Hašek was himself unusually well travelled and had a photographic memory of geographical (and other) details. It is evident that he put great emphasis on this: 8 of the 27 chapter headlines in The Good Soldier Švejk contain place names.

This web site will in due course contain a full overview of all the geographical references in the novel; from Prague in the introduction to Klimontów in the unfinished Book Four. Countries, cities, towns, villages, mountains, oceans, lakes, rivers, islands, buildings are included. Note that from 14 September 2013, institutions (including pubs) have been moved to the new 'Institutions' page. The list is sorted according to the order in which the names appear through the novel. The chapter headlines are from Zenny Sadlon's recent translation and will in most cases differ from Cecil Parrott's translation from 1973.

The quotes in Czech are copied from the on-line version of The Good Soldier Švejk: provided by Jaroslav Šerák and contain links to the relevant chapter. The toolbar has links for direct access to Wikipedia, Google maps, Google search, svejkmuseum.cz and the novel on-line.

The names are coloured according to their role in the novel, illustrated by these examples: Sanok a location where the plot takes place, Dubno mentioned in the narrative, Zagreb part of a dialogue, and Pakoměřice mentioned in an anecdote.

>> Places index of countries, cities, villages, mountains, rivers, bridges ... (590) Show all
>> I. In the rear
>> II. At the front
>> III. The famous thrashing
Index Back Forward II. At the front Hovudpersonen

3. Švejk's happenings in Királyhida

Bruck an der Leitha - Királyhidann flag
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bruck_kh.png

VÚA.

bruck_kh1.png

Der Militärarzt, 1915.

Bruck an der Leitha - Királyhida is just about mentioned in the introduction to [II.3].

Background

Bruck an der Leitha - Királyhida is a collective term for the twin towns Bruck an der Leitha and Királyhida, often used in military documents issued by Ersatzbataillon IR. 91 and others. Shorter versions were Bruck-Királyhida and Bruck a.d. Leitha/Királyhida.

Quote(s) from the novel
[II.3] Jednadevadesátý pluk se stěhoval do Mostu nad Litavou - Királyhidy.

Also written:Most nad Litavou - Királyhida Hašek

Abyssiniann flag
Wikipedia czdeenno MapSearch
habes.jpg

Ottův slovník naučný. 10. Gens - Hedwigia. 1896.

habes.png

Katolické listy, 6.3.1900.

melenik.jpg

Obrazový zpravodaj z bojiště, 14.1.1906.

Abyssinia is mentioned as an adjective in the form of an "Abyssinian king" who had been exhibited in a circus on the island Štvanice. This king reportedly fornicated with a teacher who wrote poems for the Lada magazine and she gave birth to a son who later became known as negro Kristian.

Background

Abyssinia was a monarchy that roughly covered the areas of current Ethiopia and Eritrea. It was the only country in Africa that escaped European colonial rule and the only one on the continent that was predominantly Christian. Until emperor Haile Selassie was deposed by a coup in 1974 it was the oldest existing state in the world.

Kingdom or Empire?

Many would question Švejk's use of the term "Abyssinian king" because Ethiopia is generally associated with emperors like Haile Selassie. Searches in newspapers from the period do however reveal that king was often used at the time. Probably this is down to ambiguities in the translation of the term Negus. The term emperor seems to have appeared later and Negus was also often used.

Negus of Abyssinia in Hašek's lifetime was Melenik II. (1844-1913). He is best known for having thwarted an Italian invasion in 1896 and thus preserved the country's independence. His army beat the aggressors in the battle of Adua and a peace agreement was signed. His army was well organised and equipped with modern weapons from England and Belgia[a].

Melenik undertook trips to Europe but it is doubtful if he ever visited Prague and if so he would surely not have let himself be exhibited in a circus.

Švejk's imagination

The story about the king of Abyssinia as told in The Good Soldier Švejk is obviously a figment of Švejk's imagination and although a real negro Kristian lived in Prague at the time he had nothing to do with Abyssinia (he was born on a Caribic island).

Quote(s) from the novel
[II.3] „S tím vzájemným pářením,“ poznamenal Švejk, „je to vůbec zajímavá věc. V Praze je číšník černoch Kristián, jehož otec byl habešským králem a dal se ukazovat v Praze na Štvanici v jednom cirku.

Also written:Habeš cz Abessinien de

References
aKampen ved AduaNorges Sjøfartstidende14.3.1896
Štvanicenn flag
Wikipedia czdeen MapSearch
stvanice.jpg

3.6.1908 • Pohled na stavbu plavební komory u ostrova Štvanice. Vpravo Negrelliho viadukt.

Štvanice (the island) is mentioned in the story Švejk tells Einjährigfreiwilliger Marek about an Abyssinian king who had been exhibited in a cirkus on the island. This king reportedly fornicated with a teacher who wrote peoms for the Lada magazine and they had a son. See negro Kristian.

Background

Štvanice is an island in the river Vltava in Prague that is located between Karlín and Holešovice. It is and was mainly used as a bathing and recreation area.

In historical newspapers there is no indication that a cirkus ever performed on the island, and definitely not with an Abyssinian (Ethiopian) king as an item to be exhibited. This information is surely a product of Švejk's lively imagination.

Quote(s) from the novel
[II.3] „S tím vzájemným pářením,“ poznamenal Švejk, „je to vůbec zajímavá věc. V Praze je číšník černoch Kristián, jehož otec byl habešským králem a dal se ukazovat v Praze na Štvanici v jednom cirku.

Also written:Hetzinsel de

Franz Joseph Landnn flag
Wikipedia czdeennnnoru MapSearch
fjosephland.jpg

Fridtjof Nansen and Frederick Jackson in 1896

fjosephland.png

Neues Wiener Blatt, 4.9.1874.

Franz Joseph Land is mentioned by Švejk in a conversation with Einjährigfreiwilliger Marek and the guard on the way from Mariánská kasárna to the station in Budějovice. The two portray it as an Austrian colony, inhabited by eskimos.

Background

Franz Joseph Land is an archipelago in the northern part of the Barents Sea which belongs to Russia. The first officially recognized discovery took place in 1873 by the Austro-Hungarian North Pole Expedition led by polar explorers Julius von Payer and Karl Weyprecht. On their way back the expedition requested that the isles be named after the emperor and this was reported in the newspapers in 1874[a].

In 1914 the uninhabitated islands were still no-mans land and it was only in 1926 that they became part of the Soviet Union.

Quote(s) from the novel
[II.3] "Vypravovalo se," prohodil Švejk, "že Rakousko má přece kolonie, někde na severu. Nějakou tu Zem císaře Františka Josefa..." "Nechte si to, hoši," řekl jeden voják z eskorty, "to je moc nevopatrný, vypravovat dnes vo nějakej Zemi císaře Františka Josefa. Nejmenujte nikoho a uděláte lepší..." "Tak se podívejte na mapu," vpadl do toho jednoroční dobrovolník, "že opravdu je země našeho nejmilostivějšího mocnáře císaře Františka Josefa. Podle statistiky je tam samý led a vyváží se odtud na ledoborcích patřících pražským ledárnám. Tento ledový průmysl je i cizinci neobyčejně ceněn a vážen, poněvadž je to podnik výnosný, ale nebezpečný. Největší nebezpečí panuje při dopravě ledu ze Země císaře Františka Josefa přes polární kruh. Dovedete si to představit?"

Also written:Frans Josefs land nn Земля Франца-Иосифа ru

References
aUnsere Nordpolfahrer gerettetNeues Wiener Blatt 4.9.1874
Pakoměřicenn flag
Wikipedia cz MapSearch
pakomerice.jpg

Pivovar Pakoměřice

pakomerice.png

Kvas, 1.11.1908.

Pakoměřice is mentioned in a comment Švejk makes to Feldoberkurat Lacina, agreeing that onions must be added to the gravy. He goes on to tell about a brewmaster from here who indeed added onion to the beer because it would cause thirst.

Background

Pakoměřice is a village just north of Prague, administratively part of Bořanovice. The major attraction is the castle that once belonged to the noble family Nostitz (see Feldmarschall Nostitz-Rieneck). It has recently (2020) been renovated after having fallen into disrepear.

The brewery

The brewery was one of the oldest in Bohemia and is mentioned as early as 1636([a]. The owner at the beginning of the 20th century was Count Erwin Nostitz. Around 1870 the brewery was modernised and it delivered beer also to restaurants in Prague. In 1908 the production was 17,116 hectolitres and the brewmaster was Rudolf Zilka[b]. During and after the war production stagnated and the last year it operated was in 1926. The building is still intact and like the castle it has recently been renovated.

Demography (1910)

According to the 1910 census Pakoměřice had 113 inhabitants of which 113 (100 per cent) reported Czech as their mother tongue. The judicial district was okres Karlín, administratively it reported to hejtmanství Karlín.

Military (1912)

With respect to military recruitment Pakoměřice belonged to Heeresergänzungsbezirk 28 (Prag) and Landwehrergänzungsbezirk Nr. 8 (Prag). Local infantrymen would therefore usually serve with Infanterieregiment Nr. 28 or k.k. Landwehrinfanterieregiment Nr. 8.

Quote(s) from the novel
[II.3] „Ano,“ podotkl Švejk, „pan obrfeldkurát má ouplnou pravdu. Čím víc cibule, tím lepší. V Pakoměřicích bejval sládek a ten dával i do piva cibuli, poněvadž prej cibule táhne žízeň. Cibule je vůbec náramně prospěšná věc. Pečená cibule se dává i na nežidy...“

Literature

References
aPivovar (Pakoměřice, Česko)Středočeská vědecká knihovna v Kladně
bVýroba piva jednotlivých pivovarů v Cechách roku 1908Kvas1.11.1908
Krumlovskonn flag
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krumlovsko.jpg

Karte des Bezirkes Krummau

Krumlovsko is mentioned on the train from Budějovice to Bruck an der Leitha - Királyhida. The author remarked that 12. Kompanie consisted of Germans from Krumlovsko and Kašperské Hory and that the company were singing and yelling all the time, in their local dialect..

Background

Krumlovsko is a common term for the area around Krumlov but here the author probably refers to hejtmanství Krumlov, one of the five administrative districts that Infanterieregiment Nr. 91 was recruited from.

According to the 1910 census Krumlovsko had 61,068 inhabitants of which 15,729 (25 per cent) reported Czech as their mother tongue, the rest were German speakers.

Military (1912)

With respect to military recruitment Krumlovsko belonged to Heeresergänzungsbezirk 91 (Budweis) and Landwehrergänzungsbezirk Nr. 29 (Budweis). Local infantrymen would therefore usually serve with Infanterieregiment Nr. 91 or k.k. Landwehrinfanterieregiment Nr. 29.

Quote(s) from the novel
[II.3] Teprve řev z vagonů vzadu přerušil vypravování Švejkovo. 12. kumpanie, kde byli samí Němci od Krumlovska a Kašperských Hor, hulákala: Wann ich kumm, wann ich kumm, wann ich wieda, wieda kumm.

Literature

Jabal an-Nûrnn flag
Wikipedia aren MapSearch

Jabal an-Nûr is indirectly mentioned by Einjährigfreiwilliger Marek through the proverb "if the mountain will not come to Muhammad…"

Background

Jabal an-Nûr is a mountain by Mekka, famous through the legend where Muḥammad met Allāh's messenger, the angel Gabriel.

Quote(s) from the novel
[II.3] „Milý pane kaprále,“ ozval se jednoroční dobrovolník, „papíry nejdou samy k veliteli eskorty. Když hora nejde k Mahomedovi, musí jít velitel eskorty sám pro papíry. Vy jste se nyní ocitl před novou situací. Rozhodně nesmíte zadržovat nikoho, který má vyjít na svobodu. Na druhé straně nesmí nikdo opustit podle platných předpisů arestantský vagon. Opravdu nevím, jak se dostanete z této prožluklé situace. Čím dál je to horší. Teď je půl jedenácté.“

Also written:_النور ar

Saanennn flag
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saanen.jpg

Milotický hospodář, 10.1918.

Saanen is mentioned indirectly through the expression Saanen-goat. It as escorting corporal on the train to Bruck an der Leitha who lets the goat bleat itself into the story when Einjährigfreiwilliger Marek tells about his unfortunate experiences as editor of Svět zvířat. In the corporal's home village those goats died and the owner wrote to the magazine for advice.

Background

Saanen is a valley in Berner Oberland in Switzerland from where the Saanen goat breed has its name.

The goat

As the name indicates this goat breed originates from Switzerland and is best known for milk production. Generally, they have white, short fur and are without horns. In Bohemia, they were pretty widespread at the beginning of the 20th century, and this is respected both in newspapers and specialist literature.

It is very likely that Hašek came across articles about this animal during his editorship of Svět zvířat in 1909 and 1910 but that he also may have picked inspiration from other publications he was familiar with, for instance, Zdroje hospodářského blahobytu that was printed by publisher Kočí in 1906[a].

Quote(s) from the novel
[II.3] „Ten časopis,“ odpověděl desátník se zřejmým výrazem radosti, že hovor převádí se na jiné pole, „odbíral hospodský u nás ve vsi, poněvadž měl děsně rád sánské kozy, a všechny mu chcíply. Proto žádal v tom časopise o radu.“
References
aZdroje hospodářského blahobytuB. Kočí1906
Icelandnn flag
Wikipedia czdeenisnnno MapSearch
island.jpg

Do země ohně a ledu, Karel J. Zákoucký, 1922.

island.png

Ottův slovník naučný, 1897.

Iceland is mentioned when Einjährigfreiwilliger Marek tells about the Islandic bat-the-remote, one of the many exotic animals that he invented during his stint as inventive editor of Svět zvířat.

Background

Iceland is an island and republic in the North Atlantic that until 1918 was ruled by Denmark. The Danish king remained head of state until 1944 when Iceland became a republic. The island was colonised by Norsemen in the 9th and 10th centuries and was independent for 300 years when it came under Norwegian, later Danish rule.

Reykjavik is the capital and largest city and the population of the country is now (2019) estimated at 360,000. In 1890 it had 71,000 inhabitants. Iceland is known for its volcanic activity and there have been several major eruptions in the last 50 years. The main source of income is fisheries.

Bats

Iceland is not a natural habitat for bats but occasionally they arrive with ships. In this context Einjährigfreiwilliger Marek's expression "bat-the-remote" is descriptive.

Quote(s) from the novel
[II.3] Věděl Brehm a všichni ti, kteří šli po něm, o mém netopýrovi z ostrova Islandu, "netopýru vzdáleném", o mé kočce domácí z vrcholku hory Kilimandžaro pod názvem "pačucha jelení dráždivá"?

Also written:Island cz Island de Ísland is

Kilimanjaronn flag
Wikipedia czdeennnno MapSearch
kilimanjaro.jpg

Brockhaus Kleines Konversations-Lexikon (5. Auflage 1911).

kilima.png

Ottův slovník naučný, 1899.

Kilimanjaro is mentioned when Einjährigfreiwilliger Marek tells about the "deer-sniffer-the-irritable", one of his many creative inventions as editor of Svět zvířat.

Background

Kilimanjaro is the highest peak in Africa (5,892 metres), it is located in Tanzania near the Kenyan border. In 1914 the montain was situated on the territory of German East Africa.

Jaroslav Hašek also mentions the mountain in the story Záhady vesmíru from 1922[a].

Quote(s) from the novel
[II.3] Věděl Brehm a všichni ti, kteří šli po něm, o mém netopýrovi z ostrova Islandu, ,netopýru vzdáleném’, o mé kočce domácí z vrcholku hory Kilimandžaro pod názvem ,pačucha jelení dráždivá’?

Also written:Kilimandžáro cz Kilimandscharo de

References
aZáhady vesmíruJaroslav Hašek1922
Postojna Cavenn flag
Wikipedia czdeennosl MapSearch

Postojna Cave is mentioned by Einjährigfreiwilliger Marek in his story on inventing animals in his brief job as editor of Svět zvířat. The Postojna cave did, according to Marek, at a certain time extend all the way to Baltic Sea.

Background

Postojna Cave is a cave-system in Slovenia, one of the countrys main tourist attractions.

Palaeopsylla Kuniana

It was on 17 August 1913 that the Catholic daily Čech printed a short note about "the geologist engineer Kun who not long ago discovered a flea from ancient times in a piece of amber". The discovery happened by Královec[1], the flea was blind, and was named Palaeopsylla Kuniana after the man who discovered it.

The first to unravel the story of Kun's flea was Social-Democratic Právo lidu who om 19 August that this was printed in Svět zvířat (The Animal World) during fasting time four years ago and that the "inventor" of the flea was the humorist Jaroslav Hašek. They observed drily "a new development i Catholic science and that Čech that previously drew knowledge from the Holy Scriptures now turned to The Animal World". The article in Právo lidu was reproduced in several newspapers and one of them was the Realist Party paper Čas on the 21st. This seems to have alerted Čech as they provided an irate response on 22 August. The similarities to Einjährigfreiwilliger Marek's story are thus obvious. The flea-story was even printed in USA where it appeared in several Czech-language newspapers, amongst them Minnesotské noviny on 11 September 1913.

Even though the episode that Einjährigfreiwilliger Marek tell about no doubt is inspired by Hašek's experiences as editor of Svět zvířat there are also some differences. The debate between Čech and Čas took place three years after Hašek quit as editor and can as such not have contributed to him losing the job. Nor is it true that Čech wrote that "what God does he does well". The original article in Svět zvířat has to our knowledge never been identified but to judge by the timing information from Právo lidu "at masopust (Lenten period) four years ago" it must have been written in early 1909.

Quote(s) from the novel
[II.3] Měli do té doby přírodozpytci zdání o nějaké bleše inženýra Khúna, kterou jsem našel v jantaru a která byla úplně slepá, poněvadž žila na podzemním praehistorickém krtkovi, který také byl slepý, poněvadž jeho prababička se spářila, jak jsem psal, s podzemním slepým macarátem jeskynním z Postojenské jeskyně, která v té době zasahovala až na nynější Baltický oceán?

Also written:Postojenská jeskyně Hašek Postojnské jeskyně cz Adelsberger Grotte de Grotte di Postumia it Postojnska jama sl

Notes
1. Královec is the Czech name of Königsberg (now Kaliningrad), a city by the Baltic Sea.
Baltic Seann flag
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baltic.jpg

This is how Josef Lada imagined Hašek crossing the Baltic Sea in December 1920

Baltic Sea is mentioned by Einjährigfreiwilliger Marek in his story on inventing animals in his brief job as editor of Svět zvířat. The Postojna cave was, according to Marek, at a certain time supposed to have extended all the way to the Baltic Sea.

Background

Baltic Sea is an inland ocean located in Northern Europe, the largest brackwater area on the globe. It borders Denmark, Sweden, Finland, Russia, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland and Germany.

Jaroslav Hašek and his Russian wife Alexandra Lvova spent five days on the steamer Kypros in December 1920, sailing from Reval (now Tallinn) to Stettin (now Szczecin). This was on their return from Russia. The trip lasted from 4 December to 8 December.

Quote(s) from the novel
[II.3] Měli do té doby přírodozpytci zdání o nějaké bleše inženýra Khúna, kterou jsem našel v jantaru a která byla úplně slepá, poněvadž žila na podzemním praehistorickém krtkovi, který také byl slepý, poněvadž jeho prababička se spářila, jak jsem psal, s podzemním slepým macarátem jeskynním z Postojenské jeskyně, která v té době zasahovala až na nynější Baltický oceán?

Also written:Baltický oceán Hašek Baltské moře cz Ostsee de Балтийское море ru Östersjön se

Podkrkonošínn flag
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podkrkonosi.jpg

Průvodce Podkrkonoším, Václav Kudrnáč, 1911.

Podkrkonoší is mentioned by Einjährigfreiwilliger Marek when he relates about his time as editor of Svět zvířat. Bee-keeping in this region died out after Marek's writing.

Background

Podkrkonoší is the region below the Krkonoše mountains in the north-eastern part of Bohemia. The main population centres of the area are Lomnice nad Popelkou, Nová Paka, Hořice, Dvůr Králové nad Labem, and Jilemnice.

Quote(s) from the novel
[II.3] Původ k tomu daly mé různé drobné zprávy o včelařství, drůbežnictví, kde jsem rozvinul své nové theorie, které způsobily pravé zděšení, poněvadž po mých jednoduchých radách ranila známého včelaře pana Pazourka mrtvice a vyhynulo včelaření na Šumavě i v Podkrkonoší.

Literature

Frýdlant nad Ostravicínn flag
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frydlant.jpg

Frýdlant 1915

Frýdlant nad Ostravicí is mentioned when Einjährigfreiwilliger Marek on the train between Budějovice and Bruck an der Leitha relates the story of his time as editor of Svět zvířat. The theme is more precisely his row with Jos. M. Kadlčák, the editor of Selský obzor. Marek had sent an insolent letter to the editor, describing him as a dumb beast.

Background

Frýdlant nad Ostravicí is a town in the Beskydy mountains in Moravia, near the Polish and Slovak borders. This is where Jos. M. Kadlčák and lived at the time when Jaroslav Hašek was editor of Svět zvířat (1909 and 1910).

Quote(s) from the novel
[II.3] Než to jsou věci vedlejší, ač by zajisté nebylo na škodu, kdyby se váš redaktor ,Světa zvířat’ dříve přesvědčil, komu vytýká hovadinu, nežli nájezd vyjde z pera, třeba je určen na Moravu do Frýdlandu u Místku, kde byl do tohoto článku též odbírán váš časopis.

Also written:Frýdland Hašek Friedland an der Ostrawitza de

Místeknn flag
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mistek.jpg

Místek 1916

Místek is mentioned in connection with Einjährigfreiwilliger Marek's dispute with Jos. M. Kadlčák.

Background

Místek is a former town in the Beskydy mountains in Moravia, near the borders with Poland and Slovakia. The town was in 1943 merged with Frýdek and named Frýdek-Místek. Místek was situated on the border with Austrian Silesia.

Hašek in Frýdek

It is quite possible that Jaroslav Hašek visited Místek because he once found himself detained in its twin-town Frýdek. This was because he didn't carry the necessary travelling documents. On 6 August 1903 the police in Frýdek sent a letter to their colleagues in Prague to enquire about the identity of the wanderer. The letter was signed Jan Brotánek and addressed to dr. Záhoř[a].

Quote(s) from the novel
[II.3] Než to jsou věci vedlejší, ač by zajisté nebylo na škodu, kdyby se váš redaktor ,Světa zvířat’ dříve přesvědčil, komu vytýká hovadinu, nežli nájezd vyjde z pera, třeba je určen na Moravu do Frýdlandu u Místku, kde byl do tohoto článku též odbírán váš časopis.
References
aLidský profil Jaroslava HaškaRadko Pytlík1979
Havlíčkova třídann flag
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belehradska.jpg

Havlíčkova, 1922

havlickova81.png

Hašek, Havlíčkova, 1912

Pobytové přihlášky....

adamira.png

Adresář města Král. Vinohradů, 1912.

Havlíčkova třída is mentioned in Švejk's story about some Mestek, the man who "discovered" a mermaid who he exhibited in i window in this street. The "mermaid" was a woman frå Žižkov who after finishing her daily duty as mermaid was seen soliciting in Táborská ulice. The woman didn't have a police book and when Polizeikommissar Drašner discovered this she was locked up and Mestek's mermaid business came to an end.

Background

Havlíčkova třída was the name of a long street (almost 2 km) in Vinohrady and Nusle, named after the writer and politician Karel Havlíček Borovský (1821-1856). In 1926 the street was given its present name: Bělehradská ulice.

Although Mestek actually exhibited "mermaids"[d] it has not been possible to verify that this activity took place in exactly this street. Nor has the rest of Švejk's story been verified.

Hašek in Havlíčkova

Jaroslav Hašek lived in no. 1097/81 for a period from 29 July 1912[a]. His host was Josef Alois Adamíra (1877-1953), a chemist who at the time was employed at the laboratory of Zemědelská rada (The Agricultural Council)[b]. It should also be noted that he was a prominent occultist[c] and as such may be served as an inspiration for Hašek's literary figure cook Jurajda.

Quote(s) from the novel
[II.3] Jednou před lety byl v Praze nějakej Mestek a ten vobjevil mořskou pannu a ukazoval ji na Havlíčkově třídě na Vinohradech za plentou. Ve plentě byl otvor a každej moh vidět v takovej polotmě prachvobyčejný kanape a na něm se válela jedna ženská ze Žižkova.

Sources: Jaroslav Šerák, Břetislav Hůla

Literature

References
aHaškovi v PrazeJaroslav Šerák
bAdresář města Král. VinohradůJulius Janeček1912
cAdamíra Josef AloisKulturní adresář ČSR1936
dNoční PrahouKarel Ladislav Kukla1927
Táborská ulicenn flag
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Táborská ulice is mentioned in Švejk's story about a certain Mestek, the man who "discovered" a mermaid who he exhibited her in Havlíčkova třída. The prostitute who was on display was later seen plying Táborská ulice at night.

The street appears again in Švejk's tale related to Italy changing allegiance in 1915, here illustrated by merchant Hořejší, merchant Pošmourný and grocer Havlasa.

Background

Táborská ulice is the former name of Legerova ulice, a long street in Nové město which stretches along the border of Vinohrady.

Quote(s) from the novel
[II.3] Házely se jí až na pupek jako utahanej flundře. V sedum hodin večer pak Mestek zavřel panorámu a řek: ,Mořská panno, můžete jít domů,’ vona se převlíkla a v deset večer už ji bylo vidět chodit po Táborskej ulici a zcela nenápadně každýmu pánovi, kterýho potkala, říkat: ,Hezoune, šel si to zafilipínkovat.’ Poněvadž neměla knížku, tak ji při šťáře s druhejma podobnejma myšema pan Drašner zavřel, a Mestek měl po kšeftě.“
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Okrouhlice in 1921

Okrouhlice is mentioned by Švejk when he thinks aloud about the appropriateness of calling people with animal names, something he finds entirely acceptable.

Background

Okrouhlice is a village by the river Sázava in Vysočina, 10 km from Lipnice. The author had already moved to Lipnice (25 August 1921) when he wrote this part of the novel. Already in [II.2] themes from the area around start to appear, perhaps as early as in [I.14,6]. See butcher Pejchar.

Demography (1910)

According to the 1910 census Okrouhlice had 356 inhabitants of which 356 (100 per cent) reported Czech as their mother tongue. The judicial district was okres Německý Brod, administratively it reported to hejtmanství Německý Brod.

Military (1912)

With respect to military recruitment Okrouhlice belonged to Heeresergänzungsbezirk 21 (Časlau) and Landwehrergänzungsbezirk Nr. 12 (Časlau). Local infantrymen would therefore usually serve with Infanterieregiment Nr. 21 or k.k. Landwehrinfanterieregiment Nr. 12.

Quote(s) from the novel
[II.3] Tak vidíte, pane kaprál, co může bejt z maličkýho a nepatrnýho nedorozumění, které nestojí ani za řeč. V Okrouhlicích byl zas jeden občan a ten se urazil, když mu řekli v Německém Brodě, že je krajta tygrovitá. Vono je víc takovejch slov, který nejsou naprosto trestný. Na příklad jestli bychom vám řekli, že jste ondatra. Mohl byste se za to na nás zlobit?“
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havbrod.jpg

Praha a království České, 1913.

Německý Brod is mentioned by Švejk when thinking aloud about the appropriateness of calling people with animal names.

Background

Německý Brod is the former name of Havlíčkův Brod, a town in Vysočina, 15 km from Lipnice (where this part of the novel were written). The town was renamed in 1945.

Jaroslav Hašek visited Německý Brod from 1st to 3 August 1922 where he also was present at a stage play based on The Good Soldier Švejk. The play was very well received and Hašek was very pleased as he personally received the applaus of the audience[a].

Demography (1910)

According to the 1910 census Německý Brod had 8529 inhabitants of which 8498 (99 per cent) reported Czech as their mother tongue. The judicial district was okres Německý Brod, administratively it reported to hejtmanství Německý Brod.

Military (1912)

With respect to military recruitment Německý Brod belonged to Heeresergänzungsbezirk 21 (Časlau) and Landwehrergänzungsbezirk Nr. 12 (Časlau). Local infantrymen would therefore usually serve with Infanterieregiment Nr. 21 or k.k. Landwehrinfanterieregiment Nr. 12.

Radko Pytlík

Hašek pak osobně navštívil představení v Havlíčkově Brodě ve dnech l. a 2. a 3. srpna 1922 a byl velmi spokojen. Z úspěchu měl mimořádnou radost, jako autor byl potleskem několikrát vyvolán. Rozzářen vcházel na rampu a klaněl se. Po divadle uspořádal v hotelu U Černého orla velkou hostinu. Spatřoval v tom uměleckou satisfakci. Zdrželi se se Šurou a se Štěpánkem v Brodě tři dny a utratili mnoho peněz po nákupech a hostinách.

Quote(s) from the novel
[II.3] Tak vidíte, pane kaprál, co může bejt z maličkýho a nepatrnýho nedorozumění, které nestojí ani za řeč. V Okrouhlicích byl zas jeden občan a ten se urazil, když mu řekli v Německém Brodě, že je krajta tygrovitá. Vono je víc takovejch slov, který nejsou naprosto trestný. Na příklad jestli bychom vám řekli, že jste ondatra. Mohl byste se za to na nás zlobit?“

Sources: Radko Pytlík

Also written:Deutschbrod de

Literature

References
aToulavé houseRadko Pytlík1971
Terezínnn flag
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Terezín features in Švejk's story from his time doing National Service in 1912. He was accused of having written "We'll shit on the war" on a wall by a munition dump. Švejk was taken to the regional court in Terezín because of this incident.

Background

Terezín is a fortified town in northern Bohemia, abroad better known under the name of Theresienstadt. It was constructed in the 18th century as one of several border forts to protect Austria against the increasingly powerful Prussia. Princip, the killer of Erzherzog Franz Ferdinand was imprisoned here until his death in 1918.

Terezín is still better known from the time of the Nazi occuptaion (1939-45) when it was converted to a Jewish ghetto and transit camp for prisoners who were destined for the death camps.

Two of the translators of Švejk; Grete Reiner and Ruth Bondi were interned in Terezín. Reiner was later murdered in Auschwitz, whereas Bondi survived and now (2010) lives in Israel.

Quote(s) from the novel
[II.3] Nešťastnou náhodou ještě nad tím nápisem byl jinej: ,My na vojnu nepůjdeme, my se na ni vyséreme’, a to bylo v roce 1912, když jsme měli jít do Srbska kvůli tomu konsulovi Procházkovi. Tak mě hned poslali do Terezína k landgerichtu.
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Dvůr Králové nad Labem features in Švejk story from his time doing compulsory military service in 1912. He was accused of having written "We'll shit on the war" on a wall by a munition dump. He had to write down the name of this town and a bit more to prove that the handwriting was not his.

Background

Dvůr Králové nad Labem is a small town by the river Labe is eastern Bohemia, in the Hradec Králové region. The town is nowadays primarily known for its zoo.

Quote(s) from the novel
[II.3] ,Bylo 29. července 1897, kdy Králový Dvůr nad Labem poznal hrůzy prudkého a rozvodněného Labe’.

Also written:Králův Dvůr nad Labem Hašek Dvůr Králové on the Elbe Parrott Králův Dvůr on the Labe Sadlon Königinhof an der Elbe de

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Labe (Elbe) in Hradec Králové

Elbe features in Švejk's story from his time doing National Service in 1912. He was accused of having written "We'll shit on the war" on a wall by a munition dump. See also Terezín.

Background

Elbe is a river which originates in the Czech Republic and flows through Germany on its way to the North Sea. Elbe is known as Labe in Czech. The catchment area includes most of Bohemia and the eastern part of Germany. Principal cities along the river are: Hradec Králové, Pardubice, Kolín, Ustí nad Labem, Dresden, Wittenberg, Magdeburg and Hamburg.

Quote(s) from the novel
[II.3] ,Bylo 29. července 1897, kdy Králový Dvůr nad Labem poznal hrůzy prudkého a rozvodněného Labe’.

Also written:Labe cz

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Vídeňské illustrované noviny, 28.1.1915

Dalmatia is mentioned in connection with the story Švejk tells abot soldiers killing their corporals, in this case Korporal Fiala who had his throat slit in Dalmatia.

Background

Dalmatia is a historical region on the eastern coast of the Adriatic Sea and is situated in current Croatia and Montenegro. It belonged to Austria-Hungary until 1918. Important cities are Dubrovnik, Šibenik, Split and Zadar.

Quote(s) from the novel
[II.3] Jinej případ byl před léty v Dalmacii, tam kaprála podřezali a dodnes se neví, kdo to udělal. Zůstalo to zahalený v tajnosti, jen se ví tolik, že ten podřezanej kaprál se jmenoval Fiala a byl z Drábovny u Turnova

Also written:Dalmácie cz Dalmatien de Dalmacija hr

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Drábovna is mentioned when Švejk tells the story about corporal Korporal Fiala from Drábovna by Turnov who had his throat slit by his own soldiers.

Background

Drábovna is a rock formation by Malá Skála between Jablonec and Turnov in northern Bohemia.

Quote(s) from the novel
[II.3] Jinej případ byl před léty v Dalmacii, tam kaprála podřezali a dodnes se neví, kdo to udělal. Zůstalo to zahalený v tajnosti, jen se ví tolik, že ten podřezanej kaprál se jmenoval Fiala a byl z Drábovny u Turnova.
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Turnov is mentioned when Švejk tells the story about corporal Korporal Fiala from Drábovna by Turnov who had his throat slit by his own soldiers.

Background

Turnov is a town with appx. 15,000 inhabitants. It is situated in the Liberec district in the north of the Czech Republic.

Quote(s) from the novel
[II.3] Jinej případ byl před léty v Dalmacii, tam kaprála podřezali a dodnes se neví, kdo to udělal. Zůstalo to zahalený v tajnosti, jen se ví tolik, že ten podřezanej kaprál se jmenoval Fiala a byl z Drábovny u Turnova
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Madeira is mentioned in passing by the food-loving Lacina when he talks about kidneys à la Madeira. This is kidneys in Madeira sauce, believed to be a Russian dish.

Background

Madeira is an island in the Atlantic, belonging to Portugal.

Quote(s) from the novel
[II.3] Bez inteligence může člověk žít v obyčejném nějakém zaměstnání a v životě, ale při kuchyni je to znát. Včera večer v Budějovicích v důstojnickém kasině podali nám mezi jiným ledvinky a la madeira. Kdo je dělal, tomu odpusť bůh všechny hříchy, to byl pravý inteligent, a také opravdu je v kuchyni tamější důstojnické menáže nějaký učitel ze Skutče. A tytéž ledvinky a la madeira jedl jsem v důstojnické mináži 64. landwehrregimentu.
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Skuteč appears when Feldoberkurat Lacina reports in glowing terms about the excellent kidneys à la Madeira he had enjoyed at the officer's mess in Budějovice the day before. Such a great kidney dish, he insists, must have been prepared by a true intellectual, and there happened to a be a teacher from Skuteč who served in the kitchen.

Background

Skuteč is a small town in the Pardubice region of the Czech Republic, with around 5000 inhabitants.

Quote(s) from the novel
[II.3] Bez inteligence může člověk žít v obyčejném nějakém zaměstnání a v životě, ale při kuchyni je to znát. Včera večer v Budějovicích v důstojnickém kasině podali nám mezi jiným ledvinky a la madeira. Kdo je dělal, tomu odpusť bůh všechny hříchy, to byl pravý inteligent, a také opravdu je v kuchyni tamější důstojnické menáže nějaký učitel ze Skutče. A tytéž ledvinky a la madeira jedl jsem v důstojnické mináži 64. landwehrregimentu.
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Hodonín appears in a, for the moment, inappropriate song Švejk sings about a priest and Marína from Hodonín.

Background

Hodonín is a town in Moravia, best known as the birthplace of the first Czechoslovak president, Tomáš G. Professor Masaryk.

Quote(s) from the novel
[II.3] Ide Marína od Hodonína, za ní pan farář s bečicú vína.
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Tramvaje na Pohořelci 1914

Pohořelec is mentioned when Švejk retells a story he had heard from a wounded soldier at the na Vyhlídce pub (that according to Švejk was located here).

Later it appears in the story of gardener Kalenda and his "world tour".

Background

Pohořelec is a street an area in the upper part of Hradčany. The area got its name after burning down twice in medieval times.

The barracks here were most of the time used by k.k. Landwehrinfanterieregiment Nr. 8. It can also be added that Karl Schlager, the real-life model of Oberst Schröder, was born at Pohořelec in 1859.

Quote(s) from the novel
[II.3] „Někdy,“ řekl Švejk, „se zas v gefechtu člověku udělá špatně, člověk si něco zvoškliví. Vypravoval v Praze na Pohořelci na ,Vyhlídce’ jeden nemocnej rekonvalescent od Přemyšlu, že tam někde pod festungem přišlo k útoku na bajonety a proti němu se vobjevil jeden Rus, chlap jako hora, a mazal si to na něho s bajonetem a měl pořádnou kapičku u nosu. Jak se mu von podíval na tu kapičku, na ten vozdr, že se mu hned udělalo špatně a musel jít na hilfsplac, kde ho uznali zamořenýho cholerou a odpravili do cholerovejch baráků do Pešti, kde se taky vopravdu nakazil cholerou.“

Literature

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pest.jpg

Országház, the Hungarian Parliament, in 2002.

Pest is mentioned in the same story as Pohořelec.

Background

Pest is the part of Budapest located on the eastern bank of the Danube. It is the administrative centre of Hungary, newer and more densely populated than Buda on the western bank. Pest was in 1914, apart from Vienna, the most important centre of power in the Dual Monarchy. It was an autonomous city until it was merged with Buda and Óbuda in 1873.

Quote(s) from the novel
[II.3] „Někdy,“ řekl Švejk, „se zas v gefechtu člověku udělá špatně, člověk si něco zvoškliví. Vypravoval v Praze na Pohořelci na ,Vyhlídce’ jeden nemocnej rekonvalescent od Přemyšlu, že tam někde pod festungem přišlo k útoku na bajonety a proti němu se vobjevil jeden Rus, chlap jako hora, a mazal si to na něho s bajonetem a měl pořádnou kapičku u nosu. Jak se mu von podíval na tu kapičku, na ten vozdr, že se mu hned udělalo špatně a musel jít na hilfsplac, kde ho uznali zamořenýho cholerou a odpravili do cholerovejch baráků do Pešti, kde se taky vopravdu nakazil cholerou.“

Also written:Pešť cz

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ostbahn.jpg

Ostbahnhof, until 1914 Staatsbahnhof

wiennetz.png

The railway network around 1905

Vienna appears several times in the story, and mentioned first in [I.1] during the conversation at U kalicha. The city is mentioned 8 times in the first chapter.

The plot briefly takes place here when the train with EB01 stops on the way from Budějovice to Bruck an der Leitha. Here Švejk finally gets back to Oberleutnant Lukáš after he has been permitted to leave the arrest wagon to provide food for the gluttonous Lacina. The narrative from Vienna contains some observations from the author where he relates how the atmosphere now has turned gloomy after the initial euphoria at the outbreak of war. And we are still only in the spring of 1915.

Background

Vienna Vienna is the capital of Austria and one of the nine states in the federation. In March 2004 the city had a population of more than around 1.6 million. The river Danube flows through the northern outskirts of the city.

The city was the capital of Austria-Hungary during the whole existence of the Dual Monarchy. The Emperors of the House of Habsburg held court in the palaces of Hofburg and Schloss Schönbrunn and the declaration of war on Serbia was issued from Vienna.

Railway stations

No station names are mentioned in The Good Soldier Švejk, but thanks to Josef Novotný[a] we know that one of the stops at the transport from Budějovice to Bruck an der Leitha was Franz-Josefs Bahnhof where the soldiers were fed in the evening. Novotný also mentions that they passed several more stations. One of them was probably Ostbahnhof where the trains to Bruck normally departed from.

In The Good Soldier Švejk the train goes past a station where an orchestra plays, and after some delay it arrives at another station where they have a break. Given the information from Novotný it must be assumed that Švejk's stop was at Franz-Josefs Bahnhof as this was where they were fed. This happened on the evening of 1 June 1915. Only at 2 AM the next morning did they arrive in Bruck.

Quote(s) from the novel
[I.1] Civilní strážník Bretschneider definitivně umlkl a jeho zachmuřený výraz se zlepšil teprve příchodem Švejka, který, vstoupiv do hospody, poručil si černé pivo s touto poznámkou: „Ve Vídni dneska taky mají smutek.“
[I.2] „Mne vůbec žádná vražda nezajímá, ať je třebas v Praze, ve Vídni, v Sarajevu nebo v Londýně.
[I.7] A tak v době, kdy Vídeň si přála, aby všichni národové Rakousko-Uherska dávali nejskvělejší příklady věrnosti a oddanosti, předepsal doktor Pávek Švejkovi proti jeho vlasteneckému nadšení brom a doporučoval statečnému a hodnému vojínu Švejkovi, aby nemyslil na vojnu.
[I.8] Psali poslancům do Vídně, aby se jich ujmuli, a ti začali dávat interpelaci jednu za druhou, že je náš pan obršt zvíře a podobně. Nějakej ministr poslal k nám komisi, aby to vyšetřila, a nějakej Franta Henčlů ze Hluboký dostal potom dva roky, poněvadž to byl ten, co se vobrátil do Vídně k poslancům kvůli tý facce, kerou dostal na cvičišti od pana obršta.
[I.10.2] Počal se hlasitě smát, ale za chvíli zesmutněl a apaticky se díval na Švejka pronášeje: „Dovolte, pane, já vás již někde viděl. Nebyl jste ve Vídni? Pamatuji se na vás ze semináře.“
[I.11.2] Slavný polní oltář byl od jedné židovské firmy, Moritz Mahler ve Vídni, která vyráběla všemožné mešní potřeby a předměty náboženské, jako růžence a obrázky svatých.
[I.14.5] Turci se drží dobře," odpověděl nadporučík, uváděje ho opět ke stolu, "předseda turecké sněmovny Hali bej a Ali bej přijeli do Vídně.
[II.1] Landverák si odplivl: „U nás v Čáslavi byl jeden redaktor z Vídně, Němec. Sloužil jako fähnrich. S námi nechtěl česky ani mluvit, ale když ho přidělili k maršce, kde byli samí Češi, hned uměl česky.“
[II.2] Mladý Dauerling po hrozném zápase s čtyřmi třídami nižší reálky, které vystudoval soukromě, přičemž předčasně zešedivěl a zblbl jeho domácí učitel a druhý chtěl skočit v zoufalství se svatoštěpánské věže ve Vídni, přišel do hainburské kadetní školy.
[II.3] Teď vydali ve Vídni ,Zápisník jednoročního dobrovolníka’ a tam je tento úchvatný verš v českém překladě:...
[II.3] Uvítání ve Vídni sestávalo ze tří členkyň spolku Rakouského červeného kříže a ze dvou členkyň nějakého válečného spolku vídeňských paní a dívek, jednoho oficielního zástupce vídeňského magistrátu a vojenského zástupce. Na všech těch tvářích bylo vidět únavu. Vlaky s vojskem jezdily dnem i nocí, sanitní vozy projížděly s raněnými každou hodinu, na nádražích přehazovali s koleje na druhou kolej každou chvíli vozy se zajatci a při všem tom museli být členové těch všech různých korporací a spolků. Šlo to ze dne na den a původní nadšení měnilo se v zívání. Střídali se v té službě a každý z nich, který se objevil na některém vídeňském nádraží, měl týž unavený výraz jako ti, kteří očekávali dnes vlak s budějovickým plukem.

Also written:Vídeň cz Wien de Bécs hu

Literature

References
aZ mých válečných pamětíJosef Novotný (ed. Jan Ciglbauer)2021
Királyhidann flag
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bruckneudorf.jpg

Tábori útca / Lagerstrasse, 1907

Királyhida plays a key role in the novel as most of the plot Book Two takes place here and in Bruck an der Leitha, the town across the river.

The most famous episode occurs when Švejk and Sappeur Vodička botch an attempt to deliver a letter of admiration from Oberleutnant Lukáš to Mrs. Kákonyi, the wife of an ironmonger in Soproni utca. The husband reads the letter and an almighty row erupts between Hungarians and Czechs. To protect his superior, Švejk first claims he has written the letter himself, then eats it for good measure. It still turns into a major scandal, ending up in the national press, and with the ever unfortunate Švejk getting locked up once again.

The author also reveals his impressions both from the military camp and the twin towns: the omnipresent prostitution, the conditions for ordinary soldiers versus officers, widespread ethnic strife and military bureaucracy.

Background

Királyhida is the Hungarian name of the small town Bruckneudorf in the Austrian state of Burgenland. Only the river Leitha separates the town from Bruck an der Leitha in Lower Austria. The river was before 1921 an even more important administrative divide than now; it separated the two parts of Austria-Hungary: Transleithanien and Cisleithanien. Bruckneudorf was founded around the railway station (1846) and later grew considerably. In 1867, the authorities established a military training ground (Brucker Lager) here. After Ausgleich in 1867 it was, like the rest of Burgenland, ruled from Hungary. The town was renamed Királyhida in 1898, in line with the general policy of "magyarisation".

World War I saw the camp's most active period; at any time up to 26,000 soldiers were located here, a number that dwarfed the combined populations of Bruck and Bruckneudorf. The camp still exists as a miltary training ground, although parts of it has been turned into a nature reserve.

Quote(s) from the novel
[II.3] 3. ŠVEJKOVY PŘÍHODY V KIRÁLYHIDĚ
[II.3] Jednadevadesátý pluk se stěhoval do Mostu nad Litavou - Királyhidy.
[II.3] Most nad Litavou zářil, stejně jako na druhé straně za mostem svítila Királyhida, Cislajtanie i Translajtanie. V obou městech, uherském i rakouském, hrály cikánské kapely, zářily okna kaváren a restaurací, zpívalo se, pilo. Místní měšťáci i úřednictvo vodilo sem do kaváren a restaurací své paničky a dospělé dcery a Most nad Litavou, Bruck an der Leitha, a Királyhida nebyly nic jiného než jeden velký bordel.

Sources: Josef Novotný, Jan Morávek, Bohumil Vlček, Klara Köttner-Benigni, Wolfgang Gruber

Also written:Bruckneudorf de

Literature

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Bruck an der Leitha plays a crucial role in the novel as one eight of the plot takes place here and in the Hungarian twin town Királyhida. Most of the public houses mentioned in the novel seem to be located in Bruck.

Background

Bruck an der Leitha is a town by the river Leitha in Lower Austria. Only the river separates it from Bruckneudorf (until 1921 Királyhida) in Burgenland. The river was at that time an even more important administrative divide than now; it separated the two parts of the Dual Monarchy, the Kingdom of Hungary and the Austrian Empire.

The two towns are often confused, and for understandable reasons. It is one single conurbation and both Ungarischer Staatsbahnhof and the Brucker Lager military training ground are located in Bruckneudorf. The latter was originally a mere suburb of Bruck but the two places became separated when Ausgleich resulted in a new state border between them.

IR. 91 in Bruck

According to Budějovice newspapers in Ersatzbataillon IR. 91 was transferred to Bruck an der Leitha on 1 June 1915. Jaroslav Hašek was one of the soldiers who was transferred, exactly as described in the novel. The staff of the replacement battalion was located in Schloss Prugg, and the men were lodged in wooden barracks across the river in Királyhida.

Jaroslav Hašek was frequently drunk during his stay here, and was from time to time arrested and brought to Hauptwache to sober up. He was assigned to the XII. Marschbataillon which consisted of four march companies. His company commander was Rudolf Lukas, the march battalion was commanded by Franz Wenzel. The march battalion departed for the front 30 June 1915, 8:15 PM. Jaroslav Hašek reportdely tried to avoid the departure and went missing for three days.

Quote(s) from the novel
[II.3] Jednadevadesátý pluk se stěhoval do Mostu nad Litavou - Királyhidy.
[II.3] Místo něho odpověděl dobrácky Švejk: "Do Brucku nás vezou, jestli chtějí, pane obrfeldkurát, můžou ject s námi."
[II.3] Švejk přistoupil k páteru Lacinovi, obrátil ho ke stěně a znalecky řekl: "Ten bude chrnět až do Brucku," a vrátil se na své místo, provázen zoufalým pohledem nešťastného desátníka, který poznamenal: "Abych to šel snad oznámit".
[II.3] Nad vojenským táborem v Mostě panovalo noční ticho. V barácích pro mužstvo třásli se vojáci zimou a v důstojnických barácích otvírali okna, poněvadž bylo přetopeno. Od jednotlivých objektů, před kterými stály stráže, ozývaly se občas kroky hlídky, která si plašila chůzí spánek. Dole v Mostě nad Litavou zářily světla z c. k. továrny na masité konservy, kde se pracovalo dnem i nocí a zpracovávaly se různé odpadky. Poněvadž šel odtud vítr do alejí ve vojenském táboře, šel sem smrad z hnijících šlach, kopyt, paznehtů a kostí, které vařili do polévkových konserv.

Sources: Josef Novotný, Jan Morávek, Bohumil Vlček, Klara Köttner-Benigni, Wolfgang Gruber

Also written:Most nad Litavou cz Lajtabruck hu

Literature

Leithann flag
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leitha.jpg

Cisleitanien to the left, Transleithanien to the right. 2010.

Leitha is part of the story as the larger part of the plot in Book Two takes part in Királyhida and Bruck an der Leitha, towns situated on opposite banks of the river.

Background

Leitha is a 180 km long river that flows through parts of Austria and Hungary. It empties into Danube near Mosonmagyaróvár.

The otherwise insignificant river gave in the times of Austria-Hungary rise to the expressions Cisleithanien and Transleithanien, a fact that Hašek explains in the novel. Seen from Vienna, Cisleithanien was the land this side of the Leitha, while Transleithanien was the land beyond. In daily speech the terms were synonymous with the Austrian and Hungarian parts of the monarchy respectively.

Quote(s) from the novel
[II.3] Od opuštěného pavilónku, kde dřív za času míru fotografoval nějaký fotograf vojáky trávící zde mládí na vojenské střelnici, bylo vidět dole v údolí u Litavy červené elektrické světlo v bordelu „U kukuřičného klasu“, který poctil svou návštěvou arcivévoda Štěpán při velkých manévrech u Šoproně v roce 1908 a kde se scházela denně důstojnická společnost.

Also written:Litava cz Lajta hu

Literature

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Soproni utca number 16 is the scene of the famous and ill-fated attempt by Švejk and Sappeur Vodička to deliverer the letter from Oberleutnant Lukáš to Mrs. Kákonyi.

Background

Soproni utca is supposed to have been a street in Királyhida, but it is uncertain where this was. It is probable that Hašek invented it or had another street in mind. In the short novel Dobrý voják Švejk v zajetí (1917), he lets Kakonyi live in Poszony utca 13, another street that can not be traced.

In 1983 Klara Köttner-Benigni and Konrad Biricz did a comprehensive study on the places in Bruck an der Leitha and Királyhida mentioned in the novel but without arriving at any firm conclusion on Soproni utca.

Quote(s) from the novel
[II.3] Nadporučík zabalil se opět do deky, ze které ho Švejk vytáhl, a spal dál, zatímco Švejk putoval dál do Királyhidy. Najít Sopronyi utczu čís. 16 nebylo by bývalo tak těžké, kdyby ho náhodou nebyl potkal starý sapér Vodička, který byl přidělen k „štajerákům“, jejichž kasárna byla dole v lágru. Vodička bydlíval před léty v Praze na Bojišti, a proto při takovém setkání nezbylo nic jiného, než že oba zašli do hospody „U černého beránka“ v Brucku, kde byla známá číšnice Růženka, Češka, které byli všichni čeští jednoročáci, kteří kdy byli v lágru, nějaký obnos dlužni.

Sources: Klara Köttner-Benigni

Also written:Sopronyi utca/Sopronyi utcza Hašek

Literature

Pausdorfnn flag
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Pausdorf is mentioned by Sappeur Vodička when he tells that he was about to beat up a certain Purkrábek from k.k. Landwehrinfanterieregiment Nr. 16 because he mistook him for a Hungarian.

Background

Pausdorf is said to have been a village by the Neusiedler See in Burgenland, probably a misspelling of Parndorf. Podersdorf is also an alternative but is more difficult to reach from Brucker Lager and thus less likely.

Quote(s) from the novel
[II.3] „Jednou ti už takovýho kluka maďarskýho držím za chřtán v Pausdorfě, kam jsme šli my saperáci na víno, a chci mu dát jednu überšvunkem přes kokos v tý tmě, poněvadž jsme hned, jak to začlo, praštili láhví do visací lampy, a von najednou začne křičet: ,Tondo, dyť to jsem já, Purkrábek, vod 16. landwehr!’

Literature

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neusiedl.jpg

Neusiedler See, 2004

Neusiedler See is mentioned by Sappeur Vodička when he tells about a fight between Czechs and Hungarians in a village nearby.

Background

Neusiedler See is a large shallow lake which straddles the border of Austria and Hungary. Jaroslav Hašek wrote several short stories from the area in 1905. At the time the whole sea was on Hungarian territory, today almost all of it is inside Austria.

Quote(s) from the novel
[II.3] Málem by to byla bejvala mejlka. Zato jsme jim to tam, tajtrlíkům maďarským, vodplatili pořádně u Neziderskýho jezera, na který jsme se šli před třemi tejdny podívat. Leží tam ve vedlejší vsi nějaký oddělení strojních pušek nějakejch honvédů, a my jsme náhodou všichni zašli do jedný hospody, kde voni tančili ten svůj čardáš jako pominutý a roztahovali si držku na celý kolo se svým ,Uram, uram, biró uram’ nebo ,Láňok, láňok, láňok a faluba’.

Also written:Lake Neusiedl en Neziderské jezero cz Fertő tó hu Neusiedlersjøen no

Literature

Šaščínnn flag
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cachtice.png

Hůla's unconvincing explanation

© LA-PNP

cachtice.jpg

Hašek's postcard from 1.9.1901

cachtice1.jpg

The text on Hašek's postcard

Lidský profil Jaroslava Haška, Radko Pytlík, 1978.

Šaščín is mentioned indirectly through the term "the monster of Šaščín" in the story Švejk tells Sappeur Vodička about Paroubek from Libeň.

Background

Šaščín is according to Břetislav Hůla the pilgrimage site Šaštín in the Nitra district in Slovakia but in an unconvincing manner he links it to the novel Šaščinká bestie by the Slovak author Jožo Nižnánsky. The catch is that this author nover wrote a novel thus named but rather one called Čachtická pani.

The main character of the novel was the Hungarian duchess Elisabeth Báthory (hu. Báthori Erzsébet) (1560-1615) who is believed to have killed young women and then took baths in their blood to become beautiful. Nižnánsky's novel was however published in 1932 which is ten years after Hašek wrote this part of The Good Soldier Švejk. Despite all the confusion it is still obvious that both Břetislav Hůla and Švejk had Čachtice in mind.

That Hašek was aware of Báthory is beyond doubt as he personally visited Čachtice. On 1 September 1901 he even dispatched a postcard from here. The bloodthirsty lady is pictured on the card and he mentioned her directly.

Quote(s) from the novel
[II.3] Potom ještě řekl Paroubkovi, že je huncút a šaščínská bestie, tak ho milej Paroubek chyt, votlouk mu jeho pastě na myši a dráty vo hlavu a vyhodil ho ven a mlátil ho po ulici tyčí na stahování rolety až dolů na Invalidovnu a hnal ho, jak byl zdivočelej, přes Invalidovnu v Karlíně až nahoru na Žižkov, vodtud přes Židovský pece do Malešic, kde vo něj konečně tyč přerazil, takže se moh vrátit nazpátek do Libně.

Sources: Břetislav Hůla

Also written:Csejte hu

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Židovské pece appears in the story Švejk tells Sappeur Vodička about the pub-owner Paroubek who chased a Slovak across half of Prague.

Background

Židovské pece is a park i Žižkov.

Quote(s) from the novel
[II.3] Potom ještě řekl Paroubkovi, že je huncút a šaščínská bestie, tak ho milej Paroubek chyt, votlouk mu jeho pastě na myši a dráty vo hlavu a vyhodil ho ven a mlátil ho po ulici tyčí na stahování rolety až dolů na Invalidovnu a hnal ho, jak byl zdivočelej, přes Invalidovnu v Karlíně až nahoru na Žižkov, vodtud přes Židovský pece do Malešic, kde vo něj konečně tyč přerazil, takže se moh vrátit nazpátek do Libně

Also written:Jewish Kilns Sadlon

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Neklanova ulice is mentioned in connection with the story about the locksmith locksmith Voborník.

Background

Neklanova ulice is a street in Vyšehrad that stretches along the railway line in the Botič valley.

A tragic event

In the autumn of 1909 newspapers reported a grotesque event that took place in a pub at No. 80 in this street. The young electro-installer Jindřich Stepien shot himself in the mouth with revolver in full view of his comrades and other pub guests, Amongst them were three men describes as technicians, including a certain Jaroslav Hašek.

It is however unlikely that it was the author Hašek who witnessed the tragedy. The witness Hašek is described as technician (or an engineering student), and it was reported that he lived in Ječná ulice. At the time the author officially resided above Klamovka. On the other hand Jaroslav Hašek socialised a lot with engineering students but it appears strange that he would give the police a false address and also lie about his occupation. In any case there is no connection between the anecdote in the novel and the tragic suicide.

There were a few Jaroslav Hašek living in Prague at the time so this episode most probably didn't involve the author.

Quote(s) from the novel
[II.3] „Z toho tě, Vodičko, vyvedu. Víš, kde je na Vyšehradě Neklanova ulice? Tam měl dílnu zámečník Voborník. Byl to člověk spravedlivej a jednoho dne, když se vrátil domů z flámu, tak si s sebou přived ještě jednoho flamendra spát.

Literature

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Michle is mentioned by Sappeur Vodička when he tells Švejk about a fight he took part in on Růžový ostrov.

Background

Michle was until 1922 a town on the outskirts of Prague which that year was incorporated in the capital. It is located south east of the centre, mostly in Prague IV. Neighbouring districts are Nusle, Podolí and Záběhlice.

Quote(s) from the novel
[II.3] Ale nebál jsem se celýho ,Růžovýho ostrova’. Byli tam známí z Vršovic a ty mně pomohli. Ztřískali jsme asi pět rodin i s dětma. Muselo to bejt slyšet až do Michle a potom to taky bylo v novinách o tej zahradní zábavě toho dobročinnýho spolku nějakejch rodáků ňákýho města.
Index Back Forward II. At the front Hovudpersonen

3. Švejk's happenings in Királyhida


© 2009 - 2022 Jomar Hønsi Last updated: 21.6.2022